History of the Perthshire Patons

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The Henderson Family

If ever a family had a line that enjoyed both extraordinary success and at the same time utter tragedy, it is the Hendersons of Kinclaven. From the extraordinary academic achievements of Dr William Henderson, to the sheer brutality of the murder of his niece in 1866, the maniacal insanity of his nephew and the suicide of his great nephew, the Hendersons went through just about every emotion that a family could have endured within the 19th Century.

The following Hendersons are known to have been related to Calum:
Andrew Henderson  (17?? - ????)  married Jean Bennet
Peter Henderson  (2/11/1755 - ????)  married Janet Bruce
William Henderson  (24/6/1758 - ????) 
James Henderson  (24/5/1761 - ????)
John Henderson  (21/8/1763 - ????)
James Henderson  (15/4/1766 - ????)
Jean Henderson  (18/6/1769 - ????)
Andrew Henderson (25/10/1782 - 17/4/1851)  married Janet McEwan
Dr. William Henderson  (25/1/1784 - ????)  married Margaret Morison
Jean Henderson  (14/2/1787 - ????)
Isabell Henderson  (11/5/1789 - ????)
George Henderson  (4/1/1800 - ????)
Agnes Henderson (1/10/1804 - ????)
Janet Henderson (22/11/1810 - 13/3/1866)  married James Rogers
William Henderson (29/3/1813 - 22/1/1890)
Isobel Henderson (6/6/1814 - 24/3/1900)  married Peter Anderson
Margaret Henderson (15/12/1817 - ????)
 
 
A special thanks to Greg Ross, who in February 2002 provided me with information about the murder of Janet Henderson in 1866, and to the present day owner of Mount Stewart Farm, Mrs Helen Lennox, for showing me the location of Janet's murder (see below). 
 
Also thanks to Future Publishing editor Garrick Webster for kind permission to reproduce the illustration that accompanied my article "The Mount Stewart Murder" in Your Family Tree magazine, issue 43 (November 2006).
 
 
ASSOCIATED NAMES:
 
Anderson   Bennet   Bruce   Fenwick   Finlay   MacDonald   Mackenzie   McEwan   Morison   Norwell   Rogers   Smart   Smith   Paton
 

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NB: Family history charts can be accessed at http://www.tribalpages.com/tribes/chrispaton

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Alexander Henderson - unconfirmed
b: Bef 1671  d: Aft 1671
 
If confirmed, Alexander will have been Calum's, Jamie's and Pippa's ten times great grandfather.
 
This is a very tenuous suggestion as it stands, based only on the fact that an Alexander Henderson is recorded in a note found within a series of rentals within the Grandtully Muniments from April 1671, as held at the National Records of Scotland, and catalogued under GD121/1/Box 41/223. The rental is for the baronies of Murthly, Grandtully, Strathbraan and Airntully. Alexander is noted as residing at Airntully and as having delivered two bolls of bear to John Crichtone, as did another Airntully tenant, John Lamb.
 
Alexander makes no appearance in additional rentals for Airntully in November 1660, May 1691 or 1699, but he is the earliest known Henderson found in Airntully (so far!).
 

John Henderson
Abt 1680 - 17??
 
John Henderson was almost certainly Calum's Jamie's and Pippa's nine times great grandfather.
 
John was found to be resident in the parish of Kinclaven in the hearth tax rolls from 1691-1695 (Source: ScotlandsPlaces/NRS; E69/19/2/64, Kinclaven Perthshire).
 
The established church records for the parish of Kinclaven in Perthshire begin in 1726, with Ebenezer Erskine's Secession Church not taking hold in the parish until 1737. This is fortunate for us, as our earliest confirmed ancestor is Patrick Henderson, who married Janet Young in February 1726. Their son John was duly baptised in the parish in November 1726, which means he must have been the first born son. It is known from subsequent generations that the family were strong adherents to the Scottish naming pattern, and from this it would seem that Patrick's father was also called John, the eldest son being named after the father's father.
 
Little can be concluded about John's life in Kinclaven, save that it would have been tied to the land through agricultural work on the huge estate in possession of the Drummond-Stewarts. During his existence though, John would have witnessed a major incident, the secession of the parish church to join with the dissenting Associate Presbytery in 1737. From the Original Secession Magazine (Vol. 1, 1852-1854, p.409-410, Google Books):
The Secession Church, at the very period of its commencement, obtained a strong hold in the parish of Kinclaven. In no other part of Scotland did the people more readily and cordially follow their pastor, than in that parish; and this, not merely from love to him, but from attachment to the truths and principles, for the maintenance of which the Rev. Mr Fisher, then minister of the parish, was honoured to appear.
 
Fisher was subsequently deposed by the Church of Scotland, but a measure of the loyalty to him by the locals is further recorded in the same article:
Isabella McGregor, the cousin of Mr Watson, was one of those who, on account of deafness, sat on the pulpit stair in Kinclaven parish church. One Sabbath, shortly after Mr Fisher had been deposed, a stranger minister was proceeding to occupy the pulpit, when Isabella (having the large scarlet cloak common at that period over her head), rose up and opposed his getting access to it. She declared her determination that, so long as she could resist it, no hireling should enter there, and that before any one would, her body should be as red as her cloak; and she carried her point, and compelled the stranger to withdraw.
 
We know that later generations of Hendersons were members of this church (one even became a minister), but it is not known whether they went with the initial exodus of members from the established church. The fact that the established church recorded some births for the family may have been as much the fact that they felt it their duty to record all births in the parish as it may be that the children were actually baptised as Church of Scotland adherents.

 
Children of John HENDERSON and UNKNOWN:
Alexander Henderson - unconfirmed
b: ????
 
The rental roll for the barony of Airntully in 1760 records an Alexander Henderson as having a farm of rental value of 30 8s in Airntully. Unfortunately, no other information is available to help place him just yet, but it may be that he was the eldest son, and therefore in possession of the farm. This is completely supposition - he may be unconnected, or his siblings may have been farming elsewhere. Further work on the Grandtully Muniments will hopefully shed some light (NAS: RH9/3/67).
 
 
 
Patrick Henderson
b: abt 1700
 
Patrick was Calum's, Jamie's and Pippa's eight times great grandfather - see below.
 
 
 
Thomas Henderson
b: 17??
 
This Thomas resided in Airntully, Kinclaven, and had at least three sons:
 
Children of Thomas HENDERSON and UNKNOWN:
Patrick Henderson
b: Jan 1736
 
From the OPR for Kinclaven (OPR 365/0010 0019 Kinclaven):
Feb 1st 
Patrick Son to Thomas Henderson in Airntilly also Joan Daughter to John Sprunt in newbigging also [?] Daughter to Alexander Young in Drum were all Baptized
 
 
John Henderson
b: Jan 1738
 
John was born in Kinclaven and baptised on January 10th 1738 in the parish.
 
 
 
Thomas Henderson
b: 17??  d: after 27/6/1756
 
The existence of Thomas is noted by a record dated to 27 JUN 1756 announcing that he was joining the new nonconformist Associate Session church in Kinclaven (Source: NRS CH3/502/1/127 Associate Session kirk session minutes, Kinclaven):
Thomas Henderson Junior gave in his accession
 
Thomas married an Elizabeth Barten at some point prior to April 1766, and had at least one son, William.
 
Child of Thomas HENDERSON and Elizabeth BARTEN:
William Henderson
b: 11/4/1766
 
William was born in Kinclaven, Perthshire, in April 1766 (Source: OPR B 365/00 0069 Kinclaven):
Wil: son to Thomas Henderson and Elisabeth Barten in Airntully was born Aprile 11th and baptized 13th 1766.
 

Patrick Henderson
1??? - 17??
 
Patrick was Calum's, Jamie's and Pippa's eight times great grandfather.
 
Little is known of Patrick's life at present. On January 25th 1726 he married Janet Young in Kinclaven parish, Perthshire, with the OPR record as follows (Source: OPR:365/10/247):
January 25th 1726
 
Patrick Henderson and Janet Young being regularly proclaimed were married.
Patrick and Janet are known to have had at least five children. The record that can be found for their son John, born in 1736, states that Patrick resided at the Mill of Airntully. Knowing their abode means that another series of records found almost certainly concerns a daughter to the couple also, called Janet, although the first record seems to have mistakenly named her as her sister Margaret. Janet was called before the kirk session of the Associate Session Church in Kinclaven on 3 JUN 1757 (Source: NRS CH3/502/1/135; Associate Session kirk session minutes, Kinclaven), and in this is noted as being from the Miln of Airntully (see below).
 
Although noted as being resident at the Miln of Airntully, it is not believed that the Hendersons had a tack for the actual mill itself. The following is noted in a book entitled "Decisions of the Court of Session from 1752 (to 1808)" by the Faculty of Advocates:
GEORGE STEWART Against The Representatives of PATRICK GRIMMOND
 
In 1740, Patrick Grimmond entered into possession of the mill of Airntully, on a liferent lease. He died 17th April 1796, and on the 25th of that month, Mr. Stewart the landlord presented a petition to the Sheriff of Perthshire, praying, That his representatives might be removed summarily from the possession.
 
The Sheriff-Substitute pronounced the following interlocutor: "Finds it alleged by the Pursuers, and not denied by the defender, that Patrick Grimmond, the liferent tacksman of the farm in question, died upon Tuesday the 19th April last; Finds, that in so far as the grounds were sown at the death of the liferenter, the defenders will be entitled to reap the crop thereof, on paying a proportion of the whole rents effeiring thereto; but finds, that they have no right nor title to sow or reap any other part of the farm, nor to use the grass thereon, whether sown or natural; and decerns summary removing against them, with the explanation foresaid: And with this further explanation, that in so far as the defunct has laboured ground not sown at the time of his death, or the defenders since that period have laboured such ground, the pursuer must pay a bona fide price for such labour; and further decerns the defenders to pay the pursuers L.20 Scots of damages and expences in case they fail to remove; but supercedes extract until tomorrow at eleven o' clock forenoon."
 
A bill of advocation, presented by Grimmond's representatives, against this judgment having been refused, they presented a reclaiming petition, containing an argument in law, substantially the same with that which was maintained by Michie's representatives, in the question between them and Baron Gordon. See No. CXLVI.
 
The Court considering it affixed by that decision, That the representatives of a liferent lessess may be removed summarily, unanimously "refused the petition", without answers.
 
It is not known under what conditions the Hendersons held a tack by the mill, but hopefully once more of the Grandtully Muniments have been examined some further evidence may come to light.
 
 
CHILDREN of PATRICK HENDERSON and JANET YOUNG:
John Henderson
b: abt 25/11/1726
 
John was baptised in Airntully, parish of Kinclaven, on 25 NOV 1726, as the eldest son of Patrick and Janet (Source: OPR B 365/00 0010 04 Kinclaven):
November 25th 1726
 
John, son to Patrick Henderson in Airntully was baptised
It is presumed that John passed away in infancy, as a sibling was baptised with the same forename ten years later (see below).
 
 
 
Andrew Henderson
b: 17??  d: 1???
 
Andrew was Calum's, Jamie's and Pippa's seven times great grandfather - see below.
 
 
 
Patrick Henderson
b: abt 23/5/1731  d: 1???
 
Patrick was baptised on 23 MAY 1731:
May 23rd 1731
 
Patrick, son to Patrick Henderson in Airntully also Isobel Daughter to Andrew Stewart in Kirko were both baptised.
 
 

Janet Henderson

b: abt 17/2/1734  d: after 1757

 

Janet was baptised in the Kinclaven parish church on 17 FEB 1734 (Source: SP/NRS OPR B 365/00 0010 0016 Kinclaven):

February 17th 1734

 

Jannet Daughter to Patrick Henderson in Milln of Airntully was baptized

 

Janet was called before the kirk session of the Associate Session Church in Kinclaven on a few occasions in mid-1757, and in this is noted as being from the Miln of Airntully, which almost certainly suggests she was another daughter of Patrick and Janet. The first entry is from 3 JUN 1757 (Source: NRS CH3/502/1/135; Associate Session kirk session minutes, Kinclaven):

Eodem Loco (New Church) 3d July 1757. After prayer by the Modr Sederunt most of the Elders & Deacons

It being reported that Margaret Henderson in the Miln of Arntully, an unmarried woman, was wt child, & she having been ordered to attend was called & compeared. And being exhorted to be ingenuous & interrogate, she acknowledged the Truth of the Report. Being interrogate as to the Father of the Child, she said it was Donald Cook an unmarried man, who was lately a member of this congregation That she was only once guilty wt him, & was never guilty wt any other Man. Being interrogate as to the time of the Guilt Answered that it was about five months ago, but that she did not remember the day precisely. The Mod[erato]r endeavoured to lay her sin before her, & the session having agreed that she should b just now rebuked for the same. She was accordingly rebuked by the Modr in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, the only King & Head of his Church. The session finding that the foresaid Donald Cook is now a member of the Associate Congregation of Coupar Angus, agreed that the Mod[erato]r write to Mr Carmichael to desire him to call the s[ai]d Donald before his session, & interrogate him upon what ye forsaid Marg[are]t Henderson has laid to his Charge. And the session delayed proceeding to purge the scandal as to Marg[are]t Henderson till they get a report from the Ass[ocia]t[e] Session at Coupar Angus.

Closed wt prayer.

 

A second entry dated to 9 SEP 1757 (NRS CH3/502/1/139) relates to a call to Donald Cook to step forward, and it is in this record that she is in fact called Janet, the name sticking with her for subsequent records. Two days later Janet was called before the congregation for her first punishment (NRS: CH3/502/1/139):

Sept 11th 1757

 

Donald Cook & Janet Henderson were rebuked this Day before the Congregation for the sin & scandal of fornication for the first time.

 

And again on 18 SEP 1757 (NRS CH3/502/1/141):

Eodem Loco 18th Sepr 1757 After prayer by the Modr sederunt et supra

 

Janet Henderson was publickly rebuked this day for the second time, & the session being now met, she was called & compeared – And the Modr having interrogate her as to what sense she had of her sin – she professed her sorrow for the same as having thereby dishonoured God offended his people & wronged her own soul – she was removed. The session after Reasoning were generaly of the Opinion That it would not be for the Edification to keep her longer under Scandal, and therefore agreed to Absolve her therefrom. Likeas they did & hereby do absolve her from the Scandal of fornication, & appoint this to be intimated to the congregation next Lord’s day, & that she appear before the Congregation at the same time to be exhorted. She being called in this was intimated to her.

 

Closed wt prayer

 

Janet Henderson did not appear before the Congregation as appointed, & therefore the sentence was not intimated.

 

On the 2 OCT 1757 Donald Cook was rebuked publicly and also absolved (NRS: CH3/502/1/141).

 

It is not known as yet what became of Janet or her child.

 

John Henderson

b. Aug 1736

 

John was born in Kinclaven in August 1736 (OPR: 365/00)

August 1st 1736

 

John, son to Patrick Henderson in the Mill of Airntully was bap.

 

 

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Andrew Henderson
17?? - aft 1797
 
Andrew was Calum's, Jamie's and Pippa's seven times great grandfather.
 
Andrew is believed to have been born in the parish of Kinclaven in Perthshire, Scotland, though his birth record is not to be found in the established Church of Scotland records, implying that he may well have been of a dissenting family.
 
Little is known of Andrew, except to say that he married Jean Bennet at some stage prior to 1755, and that the couple set up home in Kinclaven, where they had six children.
 
It seems likely that we can further narrow down when Andrew married to between 1753 and November 1755, thanks to a note in the Associate Session kirk session minutes for Kinclaven parish from December 1752, which seemingly notes him getting into trouble for a spot of promiscuous dancing, also known as promissory dancing! The record is transcribed as follows (Source: NRS CH3/502/1/93; Associate Session minutes, Kinclaven):
At Arntully 8th Decr 1752. After prayer by ye Modr Sederunt John Sprunt John Morice John Kea Elders & John Richie Deacon

The Officer having reported that according to appointment he had cited to this meeting the following persons viz: Andrew Henderson, in ye Miln of Airntully, Lillias Grigor, John Nathan & George Ramsays, James Stewart, Joseph Morice, John, Agnes & Elizabeth Mallochs, Mary Crookshank, John Grigor, John Gellatly & Emilia Bennet all in Arntully. They being called, they all compeared Except James Stewart, and they being Interrigate by ye Modr One by One if they had been guilty of the indecent behaviour of promiscuous dancing, They all answered in the affirmation. Then After the Indelacicy & Sinfullness of such a Practise was laid before them ye Modr together wt ye Aggravation of their Sin having got publick Warnings agt the same They were severally Interrogate […] they acknowledged their said conduct to be sinful & thro’ Grace resolved agt the same for the future, & also against the Countenancing I so far as Witness it in others. They all after much deal acknowledged & Resolved agreeably to ye Interrogation, Except John Ramsay, who after all dealing wt him would neither Acknowledge nor Resolve as aforesaid.

They were all Removed. Then ye session proceeded to consider what Censure to Inflict upon them, and after Deliberation upon ye Matter They agreed in regard of some circumstances in ye case of ye Persons who had fallen into ye forsaid Indecent behaviour, to List in an admonition of them wt certifica[tio]n That if they shall afterwards be guilty of such a practise, the Session will inflict a higher Censure upon them. And wt respect to John Ramsay the Session delayed ye Considerat[ion]n of his case till next Meeting & that both he & James Stewart be cited to attend.

They being called in, and after ye Mod[erato]r had intimated to John Ramsay what ye session had agreed upon wt respect to him all ye rest were admonished by ye Mod[erato]r in ye Name of ye Lord Jesus Christ the only King & head of his church, wt certifican That is all or any of them should be found guilty of such a sinfull practise again, ye session would inflict a higher censure upon them. And they were exhorted by ye Modr to watchfulness & Rependance upon the Lord. Closed wt prayer.

 
On 22 JUN 1765 Andrew is noted in the Grandtully Muniments as the only Henderson head of family in Airntully to be cited as a witness in an action recorded as 'Dundas vs Miller'. Also cited from Airntully were a James Taylor, David Young, George Rogie, Alexander Lamb and William Bennet (Source: NRS GD121/1/37/207/21 Grandtully Muniments).
 
In 1797, Andrew would appear to be the Andrew Henderson who was taxed at a rate of four shillings in total for the possession of two horses on his farm in Airntully (Source NRS: Farm Horse Tax 1797-1798 E0032600010-00004-00283). The only other Henderson listed is Peter, taxed the same amount for an equal number of horses. This is believed to be Andrew's son Peter. The tax for each is recorded in two separat entries. This is because a second enumeration was made for those who did not pay up. In the second entry, the tax due is noted as 4s 6d for each gentleman, and a final column listed under the heading '20 per cent/pr 37 Geo III', which relates to an Act of Parliament, is possibly the penalty imposed for non-payment.
 
 
CHILDREN of ANDREW HENDERSON and JEAN BENNET:
(1) Peter Henderson
b: 2/11/1755
 
Peter was Calum's, Jamie's and Pippa's six times great grandfather - see below.
 
 
 
(2) William Henderson
c: 24/6/1758
 
William was born in Kinclaven, Perthshire.
Henderson - William, son to Andrew Henderson & Jean Bennet Airntulley (sic) was baptized 24th June 1758.
 
 
 
(3) James Henderson
b: 24/5/1761
 
James was born in Kinclaven, Perthshire.
Henderson - James son to Andrew Henderson & Jean Bennet Airntully was born the 21th & Baptized the 24th of May 1761.
It is presumed that James died in infancy.
 
 
 
(4) John Henderson
c: 21/8/1763
 
John was born in Kinclaven, Perthshire.
Henderson - John son to Andrew Henderson & Jean Benet in Airntully was born August 12th & baptized 21th 1765.
It is believed that John may have married Margaret Miller in 1786. If so, the following is the OPR record for the banns prior to the event, from the Kinclaven register:
HENDERSON & MILLER
John Henderson and Margaret Miller both in this parish were regularly proclaimed - John Scott.
 
In the 1801 rental roll for the barony of Airntully, a John Henderson is noted as having taken up entry for a 19 year lease on a farm in Airntully in 1793, which was due to expire in 1812. He had four bolls of coal, four hens, his farm's rental value was 26 13s 5d, and he was liable in 1802 for a 10s cess payment. The only other Henderson in the village recorded was Peter Henderson, and it is likely that John and Peter were the two brothers recorded here (NAS: CR4/233). John is not listed in the Farm Horse Tax records for Airntully in 1797, though Peter and Andrew Henderson were.
 
 
 
(5) James Henderson
c: 15/4/1766
 
James was born in Kinclaven, Perthshire.
Henderson - James, Son to Andrew Henderson and Jean Bennet in Airntully was born Aprile 15th and baptized 1766
 
 
 
(6) Jean Henderson
c: 18/6/1769
 
Jean was born in Kinclaven, Perthshire.
Henderson - Jean, Daughter to Andrew Henderson and Jean Bennet in Airntully was born June 11 and Batized 18th 1769
It is believed that Jean married John Roger in 1793. The OPR for Kinclaven records only one set of marriage banns for a Jean Henderson in Kinclaven:
ROGER & HENDERSON
John Roger and Jean Henderson both in this parish were regularly proclaimed for Marriage December 15th
The couple had at least two children.
 
 
CHILDREN of JEAN HENDERSON and JOHN ROGER:
Margaret Roger
b: 22/10/1794
 
From the Kinclaven OPR:
Roger - Margaret daughter to John Roger and his wife Jean Henderson in Dam of Taymount was born 22nd and baptised 26th Octr 1794.
 
 
George Rogie
b: 17/9/1798
 
From the Kinclaven OPR:
Rogie - George son to John Rogie & Jean Henderson his wife in Dam of Muckarvie was born 17th Sept 1798 & baptized the Lord's Day after.
 

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Patrick (Peter) Henderson
2/11/1755 - 18??

Patrick was Calum's, Jamie's and Pippa's six times great grandfather.
 
Patrick was born in the parish of Kinclaven and baptised there on November 5th 1755. From the surviving Associate Secession records, the following is how the baptism was recorded:
The Revd Mr Robert Carmichael Minister of the Gospel at Coupar Angus baptized a child to the Revd Mr Alexr Blyth Minister of the Gospel in this Associate Congregation called Kathrine-- and another this same day to Andrew Henderson in Kinclaven parish called Patrick

Patrick was more commonly known in daily life by the name Peter, although records exist in which he is named both ways. 
 
Patrick married Jannet Bruce at some stage prior to 1782, presumably in the parish of Kinclaven, Perthshire, although no record for the wedding banns can be found, as the relevant Associate Secession Church records have not survived.
 
We know that Peter was certainly farming at Airdrum farm in the north of Airntully by the mid-1780s, thanks to a reference concerning one of his sons in the Kinclaven kirk session records (currently still in the possession of the parish). A footnote accompanying a transcription of a deed of mortification established by William in 1870 begins with the following:
Dr William Henderson who executed the above deed was born in Airntully in 1785 & was the son of Peter Henderson Farmer of Airdrum...
 
In 1797, Peter was taxed at a rate of four shillings in total for the possession of two horses on his farm in Airntully (NAS: Farm Horse Tax 1797-1798 E0032600010-00004-00283). The only other Henderson listed is Andrew, taxed the same amount for an equal number of horses. This is believed to be Peter's father. The tax for each is recorded in two separate entries. This is because a second enumeration was made for those who did not pay up. In the second entry, the tax due is noted as 4s 6d for each gentleman, and a final column listed under the heading '20 per cent/pr 37 Geo III', which relates to an Act of Parliament, is possibly the penalty imposed for non-payment.

The National Records of Scotland holds a great deal more records for the Airntully barony, and as such some further information on Peter has been located under CR4/233, the rental roll for the area.

From this we learn that in 1801 Peter's farm in Airntully was valued at 18 14s 7 1/2d, and that he had 3 hens, 2 bolls and 2 firlots of coal, no spring or summer salmon, and no swine! We also learn that he had a nineteen year lease on the farm, which commenced in 1793 and which was due to expire in 1812. In the following year, 1802, Peter paid 10 shillings for the local cess, or tax.
 
In the same rental roll, only one other member of the Henderson family is noted in Airntully, a John Henderson, whose farm was valued at 26 13s 5d, with 4 hens and four bolls of coal. His lease commenced in 1793 also, with the same year due for its expiration, 1812.
 

CHILDREN of PETER HENDERSON and JANNET BRUCE:

(1) Andrew Henderson
b: 26/10/1782
 
Calum's, Jamie's and Pippa's five times great grandfather - see below.
 
_____________________________
 
 
(2) Dr. William Henderson
b: 25/1/1784   d: 13/10/1870
 
William was Calum's and Jamie's great great great great great great uncle.
 
William was born in Kinclaven, Perthshire, on January 25th 1784, and christened a day later:
Henderson - William son to Peter Henderson & Janet Bruce in Airntully was born on the 25 & bapized the 26 Jan 1784
 
Further confirmation of this comes from an undated footnote within the Kinclaven kirk session minutes (in private hands) accompanying a transcription of a deed of mortification established by William in 1870, which begins with the following:
Dr William Henderson who executed the above deed was born in Airntully in 1785 & was the son of Peter Henderson Farmer of Airdrum. He was practically all his life a medical Doctor in the city of Perth & having been very successful in this way, thought it his duty to do something to help indigent old men & mortified accordingly the sum of 6000 for this purpose (as per the above deed).
 
As noted, William grew up to be a remarkable physician in 19th Century Perth. So much has been now found about him that it has been decided to give him his own page on this site, which can be accessed at the following link: Dr. William Henderson

 
_____________________________
 
 
(3) Jean Henderson
b: 14/2/1787  c: 7/3/1787
 
Jean was born in Kinclaven in 1787. From the OPR:
Henderson, Airntully - Jean Daur to Peter Henderson & Janet Bruce was born Febr. 4th & baptized March 7th 1787.
 

_____________________________

 
 
(4) Isabella Henderson
b: 11/5/1789
 
Isobel was born in Kinclaven in 1789. From the OPR:
Henderson - Isobel Daur to Peter Henderson and Janet Bruce the wife in Airntully was born 11th May and baptized next Lord's Day 1789.
Isobel married William Mackenzie on January 21st 1815 in Kinclaven, Perthshire. Again, from the Kinclaven OPR:
McKENZIE & HENDERSON
William McKenzie and Isobel Henderson were regularly proclaimed for marriage 23 Janry 1815.
 
 
CHILDREN of ISABELLA HENDERSON and WILLIAM MACKENZIE:
Margaret Moris Mckenzie
c: 19/7/1823
 
Margaret was christened at Auchtergaven on July 19th 1823.
 
 
 
Alexander Mackenzie
b: 8/11/1826
 
Alexander was born in Auchtergaven, Perthshire, on November 8th 1826, and christened on the 26th.
 
Upon the death of his uncle William in 1870, Alexander inherited nineteen guineas.

_____________________________

 
 
(5) James Henderson
b: 6/7/1791  d: 21/8/1879
 
In the OPR, James' father is listed as Patrick, rather than Peter. The listing reads:
Henderson - James son to Patrick Henderson and Jannet Bruice in Airntulley was born 6th of July and baptized 18th 1791
James went on to become a cabinet maker, and at some stage prior to 1831, he married Ann Norwell.
 
In 1851, James was recorded at Anchor Lane, Dundee, as a 57 year old cabinet maker. Also present were his daughters Christina, a 30 year old dressmaker, 21 year old Eliza, also a dressmaker, and 10 year old Ann, a scholar (Ancestry 1851 census Dundee 282/00 ED 26 p.52).
 
In 1861, James was recorded at Scott's Close, 17 Nethergate, Dundee, the house of his 42 year old daughter Christina and her husband, 43 year David Finlay, a seaman. His 18 year old granddaughter Ann was there also, a factory worker, and Christina's daughter Eliza Finlay, aged 1 (Ancestry 1861 Census Dundee, 282/2 ED 2 p.21).
 
In 1870, upon the death of his brother William, James inherited five hundred pounds (in 2002, the equivalent value was 29,250). He was also bequeathed his brother's diamond ring and all of his books and manuscripts.
 
James died at 2.20am on August 21st 1879, at the family home of 8 Speed Terrace, Tait's Lane, Dundee. The cause of his death was an angina attack that lasted some half an hour, as certified by Dr. James Duncan. His daughter, Elizabeth McDonald, who was resident at 18 Marshall Place, informed the Dundee registrar on the 22nd (GROS:1879/282/1/410).
 
 
CHILDREN of JAMES HENDERSON and ANN NORWELL:
Christina Henderson
b: abt 1820
 
Christina was born in Errol in about 1820.
 
In the 1851 census she was recorded as living at Anchor Lane, Dundee, and as a 30 year old dressmaker (Ancestry 1851 census Dundee 282/00 ED 26 p.52).
 
On December 6th 1858 Christina married David Finlay in Dundee (IGI).
 
In 1861, she was noted at Scott's Close, 17 Nethergate, Dundee, with her husband, 43 year David, a seaman from Dundee, and their 1 year old daughter Eliza. Also present were her father James and a niece called Ann Henderson, aged 18 (Ancestry 1861 Census Dundee, 282/2 ED 2 p.21).
 
Christina died September 2nd 1887 at her home at 8 Speeds Terrace, Tait's Lane, Dundee. She was listed as aged 64, the widow of David Finlay, seaman in the merchant service, the cause being morbis cardis and vascular disease of several years. Her parents were both deceased, and the informant was her sister Eliza McDonald, resident at 18 Marshall Place, Perth, on September 5th (GROS D 1887 282/1 387 Dundee).
 
CHILDREN of CHRISTINA HENDERSON and DAVID FINLAY:
Eliza Henderson Finlay
b: 9/01/1860
 
Eliza was born in Dundee on January 9th 1860 (IGI).
 
She was recorded in the 1861 Census at Scott's Close, 17 Nethergate, Dundee, with her parents and grandfather James Henderson (Ancestry 1861 Census Dundee, 282/2 ED 2 p.21).
 
 
 
Eliza Henderson
b: 1831  d: 5/2/1917
 
Eliza was born in Errol in about 1831.
 
In the 1851 census, Eliza was recorded as a 21 year old dressmaker residing at Anchor Lane with her father and two sisters Christina and Ann (Ancestry 1851 census Dundee 282/00 ED 26 p.52).
 
On April 20th 1868, Eliza married 50 year old merchant Archibald MacDonald, son of Sir John McDonald, KCB of Dalchosnie, Perthshire (reputed father) and Catherine Stewart. Sir John was a Lieutenant General, and it would appear that Archibald was an illegitimate son. The following on Sir John is to be found at the Electric Scotland website (for full article, click on the link: John McDonald): 
Sir John MacDonald of Dalchosnie, Kinloch Rannoch and Dunalastair, was born in 1788 and he succeeded to the estate in 1809.  In the district he was known as ‘Iain Dubh nan Cath’ (Black John of the Battles).  His army commitments took him to many theatres of war in which he behaved with great distinction.  In spite of leading this busy life he yet had left behind a reputation in the district of a man who cared for his tenants.  A writer of his time tells us that on his thriving estates he would have raised hundreds of volunteers who would have died for this gallant soldier. 
At the time of wedding, Archibald was a merchant residing at 18 Marshall Place in Perth, whilst Eliza was resident at 17 Rose Terrace, her uncle's house. In the wedding record, Eliza's father was recorded as a retired cabinet maker. The marriage took place at 17 Rose Terrace according to the forms of the Church of Scotland and was conducted by the Reverend James Burton, with the witnesses being Alexander Campbell, Archibald's business partner, and Helen Reed. The wedding was registered on April 23rd (GROS:1868/387/00/58).
 
In 1870, Eliza, clearly the favourite niece of her uncle William, inherited a great deal of his personal possessions upon his death. From her uncle's will, the reasons why are given, as well as a listing of what she was bequeathed:
To my niece Eliza Henderson wife of the said Archibald Macdonald who for many years resided with me in consideration of the unremitting attention and kindness I leave to her the sum of One thousand Pounds. And I further bequeath to the said Eliza Henderson all the furniture of the room which she used to occupy in my house and may be there at the time of my death. Also I leave and bequeath to the said Eliza Henderson the eight day clock standing in the lobby of my house, whole bed and table linen, one dozen of silver tea spoons, one half dozen silver table spoons, one half dozen silver dessert spoons, one silver dividing spoon, one pair of silver sugar tongs, two silver salt spoons together with my second service of tea plates.
There is no sign of Eliza and Archibald in Britain in the 1871 census. In August 1879, when Eliza registered the death of her father in Dundee, she was listed as still living at 18 Marshall Place in Perth. In the record, she is mistakenly recorded as Elizabeth. Two years later, in the census, Eliza is listed as a retired merchant's wife at Marshall Place, though is now listed as born in Dundee. Archibald is recorded as a 63 year old retired merchant, born in Fortingall, Perthshire. Also present were 39 year old general servant Jane Duncan, born in New Scone, and 16 year old servant Elizabeth McNee, from Stirling (Ancestry 1881 387/19 sched 41).
 
In 1887 Eliza registered the death of her sister Christina Finlay in Dundee (GROS D 1887 282/1 387 Dundee).
 
In the 1891 census for Perth, Eliza was listed as 60 years old, born in Errol, and residing at 18 Marshall Place with 74 year old Archibald, a retired grocer, and 22 year old servant Constance Cameron, born in Rothes, Morayshire (Ancestry 1891 387/19 Sched 21).
 
Eliza's husband Archibald died testate on July 25th 1899, with his will proven on August 8th 1899. The online abridgement at the Scotland's People website lists Archibald as a retired merchant living at 18 Marshall Place (SP/NAS: SC 49/31/177).
 
In the 1901 census, 69 year old Eliza was recorded at 18 Marshall Place, and living on her own means. Also in the house was Annie Henderson, her 55 year old niece (born Dundee), also living on her own means, and 21 year old domestic servant Janet Hogg, born in Cupar, Fife (Ancestry 1901 387/25/Sched 59). 
 
Eliza eventually died at 11.45am on February 5th 1917 at 18 Marshall Place, Perth, aged 85. Her death was registered on the 9th by her niece, Annie Henderson (GROS:1917/387/90).

_____________________________

 
 
(6) Alexander Henderson
b: 1/5/1794  d: 20/3/1889
 
In the OPR, Alexander's father is listed as Patrick, rather than Peter. The listing reads:
Henderson - Alexander son to Patrick Henderson and his wife Janet Bruce in Airntully was born 1st and baptized 6th May 1794 
Alexander married Isabel Bruce in Kinclaven on July 3rd 1828 and raised a family with her in Kinclaven, where Alexander worked as a farmer.
 
In the 1841 census, Alexander was listed as a 44 year old farmer at Airdrum, living with his family next door to his brother Andrew (GROS:1841/365/04/03), with the two brothers in fact joint farmers of the same holding, which was partially located in Airntully and partly within Murthly. In the 1842 rental rolls for the baronies of Murthly, Grandtully, Airntully and Strathbraan (NRS: GD121/1/85/8) there is no mention of the pair in Airntully, but the two boys were found noted as resident within Murthly. On their farm the rent crop that year was 74, half of which was paid to their factor, with the rest paid in July 1843.
 
In 1845 Alexander's brother Andrew decided to take on a new farm holding in Forgandenny. Prior to his departure he and Alexander were noted in an advert for a sale at Airdrum in the Perthshire Advertiser of Thursday August 13th 1846:
There will be Sold, by Public Roup, on Monday, the 17th day of August current, at Airntully, near Stanley,
 
THE Whole GROWING CROP on the Farm of Airdrum and part of the North Farm of Airntully, belonging to Messrs. Andrew & Alexander Henderson: consisting of about 35 imperial acres of OATS, BARLEY, and PEASE, and about 10 acres of good POTATOES; also a quantity of HAY.
 
The Crop will be put up in lots to suit purchasers.
 
The Roup to begin at 11 o'clock, forenoon: and the usual credit will be given.
 
ALEX. YOUNG, Auctioneer.
 
Airntully, 1st August 1846.
 
In the 1851 census, Alexander was now listed as a 50 year old hand weaver of linen, living with his wife and family at Stanley, in the parish of Auchtergaven (GROS:1851/330/009/024).
 
Upon the death of his brother William in October 1870, Andrew became the recipient of five hundred pounds (in 2002, the equivalent value using the RPI was 29,250).
 
In the 1881 census, Alexander was listed as a retired and widowed farmer living at 94 Mid Street, Liff and Benvie, Forfar. Also present in the house were his daughters Margaret and Isabella, his son Peter, and curiously two other daughters, both called Mary. (GROS:1881/282/5/2/47).
 
Alexander eventually died at 5.00pm on March 20th 1889, at Alfred Place, Lochee, Dundee. The cause was bronchopneumonia, and the informant to the registrar on the 21st was James Henderson, his son (GROS:1889/282/5/68).
 
 
CHILDREN of ALEXANDER HENDERSON and ISABEL BRUCE:
Peter Henderson
b: 1829
 
Peter was listed in the 1841 census at Airdrum, Kinclaven, as being 12 years of age (GROS:1841/365/04/03).
 
In the 1851 census, Peter was listed as living with his family in Stanley, in the parish of Auchtergaven, where he was described as a 21 year old unmarried scholar (GROS:1851/330/009/024).
 
Peter was later listed in the 1881 census as living at
94 Mid Street, Liff and Benvie, Forfar, with his occupation unrecorded (GROS:282/5/2/47). He appears to have not received anything from his uncle William's will after his death in 1870.
 
 
 
Margaret Henderson
b: 1830
 
Margaret was listed in the 1841 census at Airdrum, Kinclaven, as being 10 years of age (GROS:1841/365/04/03).
 
In the 1851 census, Margaret was listed as living with her family in Stanley, in the parish of Auchtergaven, where she was described as a 20 year old unmarried cotton power weaver (GROS:1851/330/009/024).
 
In 1870, upon the death of her uncle William, Margaret inherited one hundred pounds.
 
In the 1881 census, Margaret was listed as living at 94 Mid Street, Liff and Benvie, Forfar, and was recorded as a linen weaver (GROS:282/5/2/47).
 
 
 
Janet Henderson
b: 1832
 
Janet was listed in the 1841 census at Airdrum, Kinclaven, as being 8 years of age (GROS:1841/365/04/03).
 
In the 1851 census, Janet was listed as living with her family in Stanley, in the parish of Auchtergaven, where she was described as an 18 year old unmarried spin piecer (GROS:1851/330/009/024).
 
In 1870, upon the death of her uncle William, Janet inherited one hundred pounds.
 
 
 
Ann Henderson
b: 1834
 
Ann was listed in the 1841 census at Airdrum, Kinclaven, as being 6 years of age (GROS:1841/365/04/03).
 
In the 1851 census, Ann was listed as living with her family in Stanley, in the parish of Auchtergaven, where she was described as an 16 year old unmarried carding piecer (GROS:1851/330/009/024).
 
In 1870, upon the death of her uncle William, Ann inherited one hundred pounds.
 
 
 
Isabella Henderson
b: 1836
 
Isabella was born in Kinclaven in approximately 1836.
 
Isabella was listed in the 1841 census at Airdrum, Kinclaven, as being 4 years of age (GROS:1841/365/04/03).
 
In the 1851 census, Isabella was listed as living with her family in Stanley, in the parish of Auchtergaven, where she was described as an 15 year old unmarried cotton spin piecer (GROS:1851/330/009/024).
 
In the 1861 census, Isabella was listed as living in the brick builds at Stanley, and as working as a 24 year old cotton factory worker (GROS:1861/330/8/19).
 
In 1870, upon the death of her uncle William, Isabella inherited one hundred pounds.
 
In the 1881 census, Isabella was listed as living at 94 Mid Street, Liff and Benvie, Forfar, and was recorded as being an unmarried general domestic servant (GROS:282/5/2/47).
 
 
 
William Henderson
b: 1838
 
William was born in Kinclaven in approximately 1838.
 
William was listed in the 1841 census at Airdrum, Kinclaven, as being 2 years of age (GROS:1841/365/04/03).
 
In the 1851 census, William was listed as living with his family in Stanley, in the parish of Auchtergaven, where he was described as an 14 year old unmarried cotton spin piecer (GROS:1851/330/009/024).
 
 
 
James Henderson
b: 1840
 
James was born in Kinclaven in 1840.
 
James was listed in the 1841 census at Airdrum, Kinclaven, as being 1 year of age (GROS:1841/365/04/03).
 
In the 1851 census, James was listed as living with his family in Stanley, in the parish of Auchtergaven, where he was described as an 11 year old scholar (GROS:1851/330/009/024).
 
At some stage after 1860, James married Helen Murdoch McLean in Scotland. He worked as a master draper in Dundee.
 
In 1870, upon the death of his uncle William, James inherited five hundred pounds (in 2002, the equivalent value was 29,250).
 
On March 21st 1889, James registered his father's death in Dundee.
 
In 1891, James was listed at Forfar Road, Atholl Terrace, Dundee as a 49 year old draper born in Auchtergaven. Also present were his wife and six children (Ancestry 1891 282/4/26 Sched 165).
 
James eventually died at 9.10am on April 4th 1899, aged 57. At the time of his death he was resident at 1 Morgan Terrace, Dundee. The cause of his death was influenza of seven days and congestion of seven days, as certified by Dr. A. Johnson. The informant to the registrar on the 7th was his son Alexander.
 
 
CHILDREN of JAMES HENDERSON and HELEN McLEAN:
Alexander Henderson
b: abt 1875  d: 19??
 
Alexander was born about 1875 in the Gorbals area of Glasgow. In the 1891 census he was listed as a 15 year old scholar (Ancestry 1891 282/4/26 Sched 165).
 
Alexander registered his father's death on April 7th 1899.
 
 
 
Margaret Henderson
b: abt 1875
 
Margaret was born about 1875 in the Gorbals area of Glasgow. In the 1891 census she was listed as a 15 year old scholar (Ancestry 1891 282/4/26 Sched 165).
 
 
 
James Henderson
b: abt 1877
 
James was born about 1877 in the Gorbals area of Glasgow. In the 1891 census he was listed as a 13 year old scholar (Ancestry 1891 282/4/26 Sched 165).
 
 
 
William Henderson
b: abt 1880
 
William was born about 1880 in the Bridge of Allen, Logie. In the 1891 census he was listed as a 10 year old scholar (Ancestry 1891 282/4/26 Sched 165).
 
 
 
Peter Henderson
b: abt 1882
 
Peter was born about 1882 in the St Clements area of Dundee. In the 1891 census he was listed as an 8 year old scholar (Ancestry 1891 282/4/26 Sched 165).
 
 
 
John G. Henderson
b: abt 1884
 
John was born about 1884 in the St Andrews area of Dundee. In the 1891 census he was listed as a 6 year old scholar (Ancestry 1891 282/4/26 Sched 165).
 
 
 
 
Marion (Mary) Henderson
b: 1841
 
Marion was born in Kinclaven in approximately 1841.
 
In the 1851 census, Mary was listed as living with her family in Stanley, in the parish of Auchtergaven, where she was described as a 9 year scholar (GROS:1851/330/009/024).
 
In the 1861 census, Marion was listed as living in the brick builds at Stanley, and as working as a 19 year old cotton factory worker (GROS:1861/330/8/19).
 
In 1870, upon the death of her uncle William, Mary inherited one hundred pounds.
 
In the 1881 census, Mary was listed as living at 94 Mid Street, Liff and Benvie, Forfar, and was recorded as a linen weaver (GROS:282/5/2/47).
 
 
 
Mary Henderson
b: 1846
 
Mary was born in Kinclaven in 1846.
 
In the 1851 census, Mary was listed as living with her family in Stanley, in the parish of Auchtergaven, where she was described as a 4 years old (GROS:1851/330/009/024).
 
In the 1861 census, Mary was listed as living in the brick builds at Stanley, and as working as a 14 year old cotton factory worker (GROS:1861/330/8/19).
 
In 1870, upon the death of her uncle William, this Mary also inherited one hundred pounds.
 
In the 1881 census, Mary was listed as living at 94 Mid Street, Liff and Benvie, Forfar, and was recorded as a linen weaver (GROS:282/5/2/47).

_____________________________

 
 
 
(7) George Henderson
b: 4/1/1800  c: 21/1/1800
 
George was born in Kinclaven, Perthshire. From the OPR:
Henderson - George Henderson son to Peter Henderson and Jannet Bruce Parish of Kinclaven was born January 4th 1800.

_____________________________

 
 
(8) Agnes Henderson
c: 1/10/1804
 
Agnes was born in Kinclaven, Perthshire. From the OPR:
Henderson - Agnes Henderson, Daughter to Peter Henderson & Jannet Bruce of Kinclaven was born Octr 5th 1804.
On February 6th 1830 banns were called in Auchtergaven, Perthshire, for Agnes' forthcoming marriage to Thomas Fenwick, and were duly called again on the following day at Kinclaven, Perthshire, with the couple married soon after.  
 
After marriage, the couple settled in Stanley, in Perthshire, where Agnes most likely worked in the linen mill.
 
 
CHILDREN of AGNES HENDERSON and THOMAS FENWICK:
Janet Fenwick
b: 18??
 
In 1870, upon the death of her uncle William, Janet inherited five hundred pounds (in 2002, the equivalent value was 2925).
 
 
 
Isabella Fenwick
b: 1835 approx  d: 23/9/1888
 
Isabella was born in Stanley, Perthshire, in approximately 1835.
 
In 1870, upon the death of her uncle William, Isabella inherited five hundred pounds (in 2002, the equivalent value was 2925).
 
At some stage prior to 1881, Isabella married shoemaker John McAsh, and the couple settled in Errol, Perthhsire.
 
In the 1881 census, Isabella is recorded at High Street, Errol, with her husband and her seven children. Isabella is noted as a 48 year old wife born in Stanley. John is listed as a 48 year old Shoe Maker Master Employing One Man, and as having been born in Errol (GROS:1881/351/8/2).
 
Isabella eventually passed away at 4.00am on September 23rd 1888 in Errol village, the cause being haemoptysis of 2 months and phthis of 3 months, as certified by surgeon, Robert Robertson. The informant was Isabella's husband John McAsh, who regsitered her death on the 24th (GROS:1888/351/00/22).
 
 
CHILDREN of ISABELLA FENWICK and JOHN McASH:
Agnes H. McAsh
b: 1860
 
Agnes was born in Errol, Perthshire. In the 1881 census, she was recorded as a domestic servant, living at High Street, Errol (GROS:1881/351/8/2).
 
 
 
William H. McAsh
b: 1862
 
William was born in Errol, Perthshire. In the 1881 census, he was recorded as a lawyers clerk, living at High Street, Errol (GROS:1881/351/8/2).
 
 
 
Charles W. McAsh
b: 1864
 
Charles was born in Errol, Perthshire. In the 1881 census, he was recorded as a clerk in a publishing office, living at High Street, Errol (GROS:1881/351/8/2).
 
 
 
David McAsh
b: 1867
 
David was born in Errol, Perthshire. In the 1881 census, he was recorded as a scholar, living at High Street, Errol (GROS:1881/351/8/2).
 
 
 
Annie McAsh
b: 1870
 
Annie was born in Errol, Perthshire. In the 1881 census, she was recorded as a scholar, living at High Street, Errol (GROS:1881/351/8/2).
 
 
 
Thomas McAsh
b: 1872
 
Thomas was born in Errol, Perthshire. In the 1881 census, he was recorded as a scholar, living at High Street, Errol (GROS:1881/351/8/2).
 
 
 
Emily McAsh
b: 1876
 
Emily was born in Errol, Perthshire. In the 1881 census, she was recorded as a scholar, living at High Street, Errol (GROS:1881/351/8/2).
 
 
 
Peter Fenwick
b: 18??
 
In 1870, upon the death of his uncle William, Peter inherited nineteen guineas.

_____________________________

 
 

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Andrew Henderson
25/10/1782 -  17/4/1851

Andrew was Calum's, Jamie's and Pippa's five times great grandfather.

Andrew was born in the village of Airntully, in the Perthshire parish of Kinclaven, on 25th October 1782, and baptised the following day (OPR 365/10 0114 Kinclaven):

Henderson

Andrew son to Peter Henderson and Jannet Bruce in Airntully was born on the 25th baptized on the 26th of October 1782.


Andrew married Janet McEwan in the parish in March 1809. The following record is the OPR record for the proclamation of banns for the wedding:

1809
March 19 Andrew Henderson and Janet McUan both in this parish were proclaimed and gave to the poor 20

In 1841 Andrew and Janet were both recorded in the Perthshire census as living at Airdrum, Kinclaven. Andrew was described as a 55 year old farmer, with his wife Janet also listed as being 55. The 1841 census rounded the age of individual adults to the nearest multiple of 5, explaining the incorrect ages. Living with Andrew was his son William, age 25, and two agricultural labourers, 8 year old Isabella Fenwick (most likely his sister Agnes' daughter), and Janet MacIntyre, aged 15 (GROS:1841 Census 365/4/3).
 
Andrew and his brother Alexander together worked at Airdrum farm, which straddled both Airntully and nearby Murthly. The 1842 rental rolls for the baronies of Murthly, Grandtully, Airntully and Strathbraan have been examined at the National Records of Scotland (NRS: GD121/1/85/8), and the two boys are recorded in these as resident at Murthly. On their farm the rent crop was 74, and that year they paid half of it to their factor, with the rest paid in July 1843.

On Martinmas 1845, Andrew took on the tenancy of Mount Stewart Farm further south in the parish of Forgandenny, which had previously been in the hand of a lady called Mary Hutton, and which was situated on the Freeland Estate, owned by Lord Ruthven. Mary had been widowed in 1835 when her husband, James Marshall, had died, and she had remarried to a local shoemaker from the village. When her son David married in 1845, both Mary and her new husband gave up the farm, and moved to a larger farm in Fossoway. 

Five tenancies on the farm had been advertised in the Perth Courier between March 13th and April 17th 1845:

Valuable Farms
on the Estate of Freeland
To Be Let
 
There will be let, with entry at Martinmas next, for 19 years, or such other period as may be agreed on
1. THE FARM OF KINNAIRD, in the Parish of Forgandenny, as presently occupied by Mr Stoddart, consisting of 126 Acres Scots, Arable. It is situated about six miles from Perth, and two from the Bridge of Earn; and is good sharp soil, calculated to raise all kinds of crops.
2. That Part of the Lands of HORSELEY and the Farm of LITTLE KINNAIRD, all as presently possessed by Mr John Johnston, consisting of 40 Scots Acres, or thereby, immediately adjoining the prefixed, and susceptible of much improvement.
3. The FARM of BOATMILN, presently possessed by Mr Stoddart, consisting of upwards of 45 Scots Acres, all Arable Ground of good quality, and capable of producing all kinds of crops. It is beautifully situated on the banks of the River Earn, about three miles from the Bridge of Earn, and six miles from Perth.
4. The Farm of MOUNT STEWART, with a SMALL PART taken some years ago from the adjoining FARM of HORSELEY, all as presently occupied by David Marshall, consisting of 54 Scots Acres of Arable Land, and 10 Acres or thereby of Pasture, susceptible of much improvement. It is situated nearer the Bridge of Earn than the prefixed, and in the Parish of Forgandenny.
5. The Lands of DUMBUILS, situated in the parish of Forgandeeny, consisting of upwards of 30 Scots Acres of Arable, and upwards of 20 Scots Acres, or thereby, of Pasture; presently occupied, partly by Mr David Marshall and partly by the representatives of the now deceased Thos. Finlayson.
 
JOHN PEARSON, at Freeland, will give directions for shewing the said Farms; and offers will be received by PEDDIE & MACKENZIE, Writers, Perth. Factors on the Estate  of Freeland, betwixt and the 30th of April next.
22nd March, 1845

farm1.jpg
Mount Stewart Farm (Nov 2002)

Prior to moving to Forgandenny, Andrew and his brother Alexander were noted in an advert for a sale at Airdrum in the Perthshire Advertiser of Thursday August 13th 1846:
There will be Sold, by Public Roup, on Monday, the 17th day of August current, at Airntully, near Stanley,
 
THE Whole GROWING CROP on the Farm of Airdrum and part of the North Farm of Airntully, belonging to Messrs. Andrew & Alexander Henderson: consisting of about 35 imperial acres of OATS, BARLEY, and PEASE, and about 10 acres of good POTATOES; also a quantity of HAY.
 
The Crop will be put up in lots to suit purchasers.
 
The Roup to begin at 11 o'clock, forenoon: and the usual credit will be given.
 
ALEX. YOUNG, Auctioneer.
 
Airntully, 1st August 1846.
 
Andrew duly moved to Mount Stewart Farm on a nineteen year joint tenancy with his son William (it seems that his wife Janet had died by this point). The tenancy was quite extensive, covering some sixty three acres, including part of the adjacent North Dumbuils farm. Part of their weekly routine would have included a regular Friday trip to Perth to deal at the local market. The 1845 Statistical Account of Perth gives us an insight into the market's dealings and the various fairs that took place within the year:

Fairs.- There are two weekly fairs or markets in the city, on Wednesday and Fridays. That held on Friday is the principal one. The chief business is among the farmers of the neighbourhood, who convene at the cross, give and receive intelligence on the subject of current prices, or of whatever in any way affects the agricultural interests of the country. It is the day when butter, eggs, &tc are brought in for sale, and when, as was particularly the case in former times, housewives lay in their stock of provisions for the week.

But there are also what may be called great fairs or markets in the course of the year. 1.The first of Luke (the first of hail ouk of March.) It is held on the first Friday of that month. Horses and cattle are sold at it. - 2.Palm-sun-even. It is held on the first Friday of April. Cattle, barley, lintseed, and grass seed are sold at it. - 3. Midsummer. It is held on the first Friday of July. It is a season of holiday enjoyment among the peasantry, when they repair to the town to meet with one another. Farm servants were formerly hired on this day. The sale of hores and cattle is usually great. - 4. St Johns Day. It is held on the first Friday of September. The principal articles sold at it are salted butter and cheese. - 5. Little Dunning or St Dennis. It is held on the third Friday of October. It also is a butter and cheese market, and is the understood time for hiring servants for the year. - 6. Andrews Mass. It is held on the 11th day of December. It is at this season that tenants of houses give up their leases, or enter on new ones for the followng year.

 
To get to the market, Andrew and William would have ridden a horse and cart. Recently, a conversation with the present day owner of Mount Stewart Farm, a Mrs Helen Lennox, has revealed that her son discovered a brass name plate bearing the legend "Henderson" on it whilst working on the farm. It is believed that this was the name plate attached to the cart. Every effort is now being made to try and find where the brass plate has been stored, and upon its retrieval, Mrs Lennox has very kindly offered to return it to me, as one of Andrew's descendants, for which I am eternally grateful.

In the 1851 Census, Andrew was incorrectly described as being 61 years old. He died shortly after the census was taken on 17 APR 1851, as noted in the Perthshire Advertiser of 24 APR 1851:
DIED - At Mount Stewart, Strathearn, on the 17th current, Mr ANDREW HENDERSON, late tenant there, in the sixty-eighth year of his age.
 
An inventory of his possessions was eventually created on 4 FEB 1853 (SRO, Vol 50 folio 179; SC49/31/55 new ref no:). The inventory states:

Page one hundred and seventy ninth

Inventory of the Personal Estate of Andrew Henderson No.19 1853

At Perth the fourth day of February Eighteen Hundred and fifty three years. In presence of James Crawford Esquire Advocate Commissary of the Commissariot of the County of Perth Compeared George Gray Writer in Perth as Procurator for the Executor after named and designed and gave in the Inventory of the Personal Estate of Andrew Henderson joint Tenant of the farm of Mount Stewart, Bridge of Earn (duly stamped with three pounds Sterling of duty) and oath thereon after after written desiring the same to be recorded in the Commissary Court Books of Perthshire conform to Act of Parliament which desire the said Commissary finding reasonable he ordained the same to done accordingly the tenor whereof follows (??) Inventory of the Personal Estate and Effects which belonged to the deceased Andrew Henderson joint Tenant of the Farm of Mount Stewart Bridge of Earn at the time of his death which happened on the __ day of April Eighteen Hundred and fifty one years.

First Cash in the house - - -

Second Cash in deposit account with the Central Bank in name of William Henderson 74, 10s, 3d

Interest due thereon 18s, 11d

Total = 75 14 2

One half thereof due deceased 37, 14s, 7d

Third value of the crop and stocking and household furniture on the farm of Mount Stewart as certified by John Jackson licensed appraiser 224, 16s, 9d

One half thereof due deceased 122, 8s, 4 1/2d

Fourth Body Clothes 4

Total = 164, 2s, 11 1/2d

Signed William Henderson

James M Patton C.D.

At Perth the fourth day of February Eighteen Hundred and fifty three years. In presence of James Murray Patton Esq of Glenalmond one of the Commissary Deputes of the Commissariot of Perth Compeared William Henderson Farmer at Mount Stewart Bridge of Earn oldest son and nearest in kin of the deceased Andrew Henderson late joint Tenant with the said William Henderson on the said farm of Mount Stewart who being solemnly sworn and examined depones that the said Andrew Henderson died upon the ____ day of April Eighteen Hundred and fifty one years without leaving any settlement or Testamentary Writing relative to the disposal of his personal estate or effects and in consequence thereof the Deponent has entered upon the management of the deceaseds personal estate as eldest son and nearest in kin of the Deceased.

That the Deponent does not know of any settlement or writing relative to the disposal of the deceaseds personal Estate or effects or any part of them.

That the foregoing Inventory which is signed by the Deponent and the said Commissary a relative hereto is a full and true Inventory of all the personal and moveable Estate and effects of the deceased Andrew Henderson wheresoever situated already recovered or known to be existing belonging or due to him beneficially at the time of his death and that the value of the said Estate situated in Scotland is of the value of one hundred pounds Sterling and under the value of two hundred pounds Sterling. All which is truth as the Deponent shall answer to God.

Signed William Henderson

James M. Patton Comy. Dept.

Comp W Mc E

 

In 1881 and 1884, long after Andrew's death, his son William was admitted to the Murray Royal Lunatic Asylum in Perth, having been driven insane by the brutal murder of his sister Janet in 1866 (see below). In the admission papers for both entry points, William's father Andrew was noted as having died from influenza.



CHILDREN of ANDREW HENDERSON and JANET McEWAN:

(1) Janet Henderson
b: 22/11/1810
 
Calum's, Jamie's and Pippa's four times great grandmother - see below.
 
 
 
(2) William Henderson
b: 29/3/1812   d: 22/1/1890
 
Of all of Calum's, Jamie's and Pippa's family, their five times great uncle, William Henderson, perhaps had the most tragic lifestory of all. 
 
William was born in Airntully in 1813. The OPR entry reads:
Henderson - William Henderson son of Andrew Henderson (Airntully) and Janet McEwen was born March 29th 1813.
In 1841 William was recorded in the census as being 25 years old and was living at Airdrum, Kinclaven, with his parents. The 1841 census rounded the age of individual adults to the nearest multiple of 5, explaining the incorrect age. Also living with him and his parents were two agricultural labourers, Isabella Fenwick (possibly his cousin) aged 8, and Janet MacIntyre, aged 15 (GROS:1841/365/4/3).
 
In the Perthshire Advertiser of December 28th 1843 William was noted as having won third prize in a grand ploughing match on December 19th at Murthly, out of some eighty nine competitors. He was awarded 1 15s, and the article notes that all of the competitors enjoyed lunch at the local castle.

Forgandenny in 1863. Perth & Kinross Council. Licensor www.scran.ac.uk

In 1845, after responding to an advert in the Perth Courier between March 13th and April 17th 1845, William and his father took up a joint nineteen year tenancy of Mount Stewart Farm in Forgandenny, situated on 63 acres of the Freeland Estate owned by Lord Ruthven, near Bridge of Earn.
 
In April 1851 both William and Andrew are recorded at the farm in the census. However, shortly after the census was taken, Andrew died of influenza, leaving William to take sole charge of the farm. He compeared before the magistrates on February 4th 1853 for the confirmation of his father's estate, Andrew having died intestate. In total, William was awarded 164, 2s and 11 1/2d (the equivalent worth in 2002 being 10,045).
 
In the 1861 Census for Forgandenny we learn that William was still running the farm (now described as some 10 acres), employing a ploughman called David Jardiner, from Kinrossshire, and a young boy to assist him. William was still unmarried, and also employed a 29 year old servant called Elizabeth Taylor, originally from Fife (GROS:1861/353/2).
 
In the Forgandenny Valuation Rolls for 1865-66, William was noted as being the occupier of the farm, with the proprietor noted as the Rt. Hon. Baron Ruthven of Freeland. The lease was 19 years and the annual rent some 130 (NAS: VR113/11/51).

Towards the end of 1865, William suffered a burglary at Mount Stewart, losing a silver watch, 2 and some clothing. The burglar was not caught, and William must have been enraged that someone should have done such a deed. But it was to be nothing compared to what would happen next at the farm...

On March 28th 1866, William's sister Janet Rogers (nee Henderson) came to stay with him for a short period at the farm, in order to help with the busy dairy period and to look after him, whilst her own husband worked on the Rohallion estate further north. William had just sacked his domestic servant of two weeks, Christina Miller, though the reason is unclear. He claimed that she had been getting too intimate with his ploughman, James Crichton, whilst she had claimed he had been making unwanted advances towards her, and had quit.

 

Two days after Janet's arrival, on March 30th, William went on a visit to the Perth market on business, but when he returned later that evening, it was to discover that his sister had been brutally murdered in his kitchen. Shocked, William at once sought help from the police and the Procurator Fiscal in Perth, to whom he wrote the following short note with a couple of hours after discovering Janet's body:

Bridge of Earn  March 30 1886

 

Dear Sir,

 

Please come out here as soon as possible as my sister has been murdered today while I was in Perth.

 

Your obedient servant,

 

Wm Henderson

 

Address: Wm Henderson, Mount Stewart, Bridge of Earn

 

William was cleared of any involvement in the murder, although suspicions were so high in the community that he was involved that his brother-in-law James Rogers, Janet's husband, felt it necessary to publish a letter in the local newspaper outlining his support for William. The following is the letter in which James outlined how he came to hear of his wife's death, and which he hoped would clear William's name: 

Being in the woods of Rohallion at my employment on the 31st of March, I was abruptly accosted by an affinity relation of my own, on horseback, to leave all and come along with him. Judging within myself that something of importance had taken place, I demanded an explanation, which he demurred in giving. Obstinate on my part to move without it, and being prepared for the worst, he told me that my wife was dead, and that she had been brutally murdered in Mount Stewart kitchen. Hastening on with a bleeding heart to the heartrending scene which was soon to present itself, I arrived at Mount Stewart about twelve o'clock, accompanied by a niece of my wife's, likewise the niece's father. On entering the house (the door being opened by my brother-in-law), and on receiving a light, I immediately entered the kitchen, found the dead body of my wife stretched lying on two tables, wound up in a sheet. Uncovering her face, I found it looked pleasant, the eyes being shut. Examining her neck, I found no marks of violence, the wound being made on the left side of the head behind the ear. Next examined the floor; found about two feet sqaure in a pool of blood; the walls and all the kitchen furniture bespattered with blood. Dear me, I remarked to my brother, my wie is is lying just as if she were in a slaughter-house; why was not the room cleaned up? He answered that the authorities would not allow it to be touched until they were done of it. On finding two police in an adjacent room of the house, I was assured by them that their work was done with regard to the body and room. So we commenced work, had the room washed, the body dressed and coffined, ready to be transferred to the sorrowing family at Airntully.

Now for the murderer. What was his motive? Evidently plunder, as lockfasts had been torn off, and all parts of the house rifled. Was there energy on the part of the authorities to detect the murderer and thief, or was there a facility given for his escape? I have my doubts. It is evident from what my brother-in-law tells me, that some months previous his house was broken into by a window, a silver watch and two pounds of money carried of, besides a pair of trousers, the trousers being got some days after, lying in that belt of wood running along the north side of the steading. The robbery was reported to the police of the district, the number of the watch given, but no clue was ever found to this case. I have a strong impression on my mind that the depredator of the first case has been the murderer in the second; had the first been found out, the second might have been prevented. Two police kept a close watch over the house and its inmates till up to Sunday afternoon, until one of their supervisors arrived from Perth, and sispersed them among the neighbourhood farm-steads and villages to seek for information. I evidently saw that their suspicion up to this time related on the innocent. This suspicion, by using sound logic, might have been thrown to the wind at the first stage of examination, which I can show. On examining the ploughman on Monday morning, he told me that he saw Mrs Rogers at the kitchen door talking to a man through the course of the day. This shows that she was alive after her brother left for Perth. He likewise told me that they unharnessed their horses both together at night, and he left his master in the stable. Now, it was impossible that he could have committed such an unnatural, heartrending deed, and put the house in the state it was found in, between that time and the time he gave the alarm. Besides, she was his favourite member of the family, one whom he always opened his mind to. I will never forget his cries on Sunday morning. He took me aside from the house, and gave vent to his grief in cries most pitiful. I can assure the public, who have been listening to many a wild rumour these two weeks past, that there is not the least shadow of suspicion resting on my mind, or on the minds of any of Mr Henderson's friends, concerning this foul deed.

JAMES ROGERS - Airntully, April 16, 1866.


For the first few months after the murder, William remained the occupier of Mount Stewart, until a new tenant could be found. (For more on Janet's murder, see below, and visit the Mount Stewart Farm Murder
page). The investigation continued for a year, through which William believed the murderer to be his ploughman, James Crichton, and at one point he actually appears to have tried to frame him. The kitchen door had been locked on the night of the murder, and William had been forced to gain entry to the house through an upstairs bedroom window. The key, which was believed missing, was subsequently 'found' by William. It was later alleged that he had placed it into the cesspool outside and arranged for its 'discovery' by a friend visiting the premises. Once found, he had claimed to the police that only he and Crichton could have had access to it. However, when the lawyers prosecuting any future trial learned of this, they believed it to be a desperate measure by William, and refused it as admissable as evidence.
 
In April 1867, a trial finally happened, with Crichton in the dock, ironically based on some late testimony submitted by William's former servant Christian Miller. Whilst staying with the Crichtons, after arriving to pick up her belongings from Mount Stewart a few days after the murder, she had claimed to have overheard Crichton say to his wife that he was responsible for the murder. The jury listened intently for two days before reaching a verdict of non-proven. Crichton was set free, and for William, the result was devastating. He accused two of the witnesses of having committed perjury, and was sucessfully prosecuted fro slander. The following article in the Perth Courier of April 30th 1867 outlines what happened:
THE MOUNT STEWART MURDER - ACTION FOR SLANDER AGAINST MR HENDERSON
 
On Tuesday, before Sheriff Barclay, John Ritchie, labourer, Dumbouls, sued William henderson, sometime farmer at Mount Stewart, for 12 sterling, being damages sustained by the pursuer, by stating and asserting, (1), On or about the the 11th day of April current, at or near the Bridge of Earn, that the pursuer had perjured himself; (2), on said day, at or near Carmichael cottages, Bridge of Earn, to James Williamson, residing at Carmichael Cottages, and John G. Petesr, clerk in the Sheriff Clerk's office, Perth, that the Pursuer had perjured himself; (3), on said day, at or near Mount Stewart, to Peter Stewart, farmer, Mount Stewart,. That the pursuer had perjured himself; or had on the said day, at the places foresaid, and in the presence and hearings of the said persons, used words of similar import and effect, meaning thereby that the pursuer had been guilty of the crime of perjury, and had sworn what he knew was false, when examined before the Circuit Court of Justiciary at Perth on the 10th current, as a witness in exculpation in the prosecution at the instance of Her Majesty's Advocate against James Crichton for the alleged crime of murder - whereby the pursuer has been injured, and has suffered greatly in his feelings and character. Mr henry Whyte appeared for the pursuer, and Mr Horace Skeete for the defender. The first charge on the summons haveing been departed from, evidence was led as to the remaining two accusations, which were fully substantiated by the testimony of the parties in whose hearing the slander was alleged to have been uttered. Parties having been heard, the Sheriff found the defender liable in damages to the extent of 30s, remarking that the case was considerably mitigated by the fact that it had been the defender's own sister that had been murdered, and that any display of feeling on his part in connection with the case was, though not perhaps justifiable, entitled to some excuse.
 
 
Three years later, in October 1870, William received a legacy of 600 from his father's brother Dr William Henderson (see earlier), who passed away at the age of 86. But prior to this, William had obviously lost the confidence of his uncle. It was William senior's original intention that one of the four Trustees to his proposed Mortification fund for the relief of the poor in Perth was to be his nephew William. To this end, in his original Deed of Settlement, drawn up on May 28th 1870, William senior left notice that a bequest of 1000 was to be given to his nephew, and a place on the board of the new charity. But several months after this, on June 6th 1870, his uncle suddenly changed his will, cutting William off the Board completely, and reducing his legacy to 600, just over half the original amount. The reason for this is not clear. Perhaps William senior had harboured some doubts about his nephew's innocence in the Mount Stewart Murder?  Or perhaps he had begun to be concerned of his nephew's mental state? Perhaps William junior had been found guilty of some act of immorality, no longer qualifying under the strict conditions left by his uncle to be on the board? We may never know, but whatever the reason, William junior received his reduced bequest some months after the death of his uncle in October 1870.

In the 1871 census, William was recorded as living alone on the Back Road in Scone, in a fairly substantial house with eight rooms with at least one window. He was listed as a retired farmer (GROS:1871/394/A0 001/0A 003). This would appear to be the same house noted as existing in Belford Place, Lover's Lane, in Scone in the Valuation Rolls for the village from 1872-1885. In the first of these annual rolls so far consulted, 1872-73 (VR113/18/74), William is noted as a residenter paying 5 15s rent annually to the superior, Murrayshall, as well as 2 feu duty, but he was also the proprietor of an adjacent property, for which he collected rent of 21 annually from a corn merchant called Alexander Brown, until 1874-75, when it went up to 22. This second property was described in the rolls as comprising a house, garden, gig and workshop. After this the tenant of the adjacent property changed regularly. In 1875-76 it was a William Bissett, paying 19, 1876-77 it was a dentist called John Stewart, at the same rate, and then from 1877-79 it was  potato merchant called Peter Shepherd at 19 19s annually. In 1879-80 a Mr Awdrey was in residence, though the rent had by now been slashed annually to just 15. From this year it appears that the road was also renamed to Lynedoch Road.

In the 1881 census, William was again listed as a retired farmer, living on Lyndoch Road, Scone, Perthshire, and was still listed as unmarried (GROS:1881/394/A/1/2). However, things were about to take a very dark turn in William's life.

Murray's Royal Asylum, where William Henderson died in 1890

Just a few days after the census, on May 20th 1881, William's solicitor Melville James, petitioned the Sheriff Substitute of Perth to have William placed into the Murray Royal Asylum being "at present in a state of Mental Derangement". The form, entitled "The Petition, Statement, Medical Certificates, Sheriff's Order, and Obligation Required for the Admission of Patients into the Murray Royal Asylum, Perth", goes into remarkable detail. It states that William was a single 69 year old retired farmer, an adherent of the Established Church, and that he had been insane for about ten days. He was not listed as epileptic, suicidal or dangerous to others. His nearest known relative was recorded as Isabella Henderson or Anderson, his sister (see below), who was resident in Murthly. His own address was also described as Belford Place, Lyndoch Road, Scone.
 
William's birthplace was noted as Airntully, and that he had been educated as a child in the Parish School in Kinclaven. His disposition was described as melancholic and reserved, but that he was "steady, industrious" and "temperate"., and that he was "cleanly, but untidy".  His father Andrew was stated to have died as a result of influenza, whilst his mother had died of heart disease, though no date was given for either event. There was also mention amongst his siblings of "one accidental death" (i.e. Janet's murder) and "one heart disaease" (his sister Margaret, who died in 1869).The doctor certifying the emergency, Augustus Barclay Calder, described the following as facts indicating William's insanity:
Talks constanrtly and incoherenbtly. Cries for the police without due reason. says his entrails have been ?? and buried in McLeish's Place.
 
This examination took place on May 17th at William's home. A second opinion was provided by another physician, Howard Bendall, who visited William, described as a feuar at Belford Place, on the 19th. He also described William as "of unsound mind" and the following description from him lists his grounds for having William placed into the asylum:
Rambles from subject to subject in conversation. Inconsequent in his answers to questions. States that he has been poisoned this morning by the attendant in charge, & requested me to use the stomach pump for removal of the poison.
 
Hugh Barclay, the Sheriff Substitute, agreed to William's detention on the 20th, for which the Health Board charged 50 per quarter, payment of which was to be made by Melville Jamieson, William's solicitor.
 
From subsequent medical papers, it would appear that William was judged to be insane for about three months, before being released back out into the community. The following description outlines his time in the Murray Royal from May 20th to August 16th 1881:
An unmarried retired farmer. Established Church. Fairly educated.
 
No family history of insanity. Father died of influenza. Mother & one relative of heart disease. No consaguinity. No paralysis etc in family.
 
Has always been peculiar, of late years more so. Lives alone in a miserly way. Was melancholic and reserved in disposition, but steady and industrious.
 
About ten das ago became excited in consequence of a dispute about a cess-pool. This excitement was much increased and he became raving and frantic. Cries for police and protection. First attack. Not epileptic, suicidal or dangerous.
 
Reg. of Phys. Cond. p.27
 
Mental state - excited & incoherent, he wants protection from the police. "Want old reports, send for the key". refers continually to the murder of his sister for which he was apprehendd & acquitted 15 years ago. In a state of acute mania.
 
The report then goes into some detail of his actual internment in the hospital:
May 20. Bowels moved slightly, cough & bronchitic spit. To have an enema.
 
May 21. Bowels relieved of foecal accumulation.
 
May 28. Recovering slowly, but still talking about the murder - evidence - the key etc.
 
June 10. Quiet and comfortable - has a delusion that the attendant keeps him here.
 
June 21. Gives a confused story of his stay, says there was nothing the matter with him, same excitement caused by the constable setting everybody against him. Forgets dates & refers.... (next part missing)
 
July 23. Continues diffusive and locquacious. Vows vengeance agsint the Inspr. of Poor & the Policeman for causing all his excitement & incarceration. Says his garden will be ruined that nobody can get into it, the key being hidden. Accuses his friends of putting him here to secure his money.
 
Aug 16. Sent to be held in the care of his nephew at Blackford.
 
It is not yet clear who this nephew is, though it is likely that it is in fact his nephew-in-law, William Hay Paton, the husband of his niece Janet Rogers.
 
Whilst William was resident with a nephew, in the Valuation Rolls for 1881-83 commission agent Robert Maxwell was in residence in his second property in Belford Place. In these entries we find that William's payment for this and his own property were made by 'Melville Jameson, solicitor Perth'.
 
William's descent into madness had not ended after a mere three months. In October 1882, the following entry was added to his Murray Royal record:
Oct 1882. Met on the Street by Reporter, full of delusions as to people annoying him, threatening law proceedings, and making irrational references to his sister's murder.
 
In 1883-84 the adjacent tenant in Belford Place was a traveller called William Osborne, paying 18 rent and a feu duty of 14s 6d, whilst in 1884-85 the next door property was now noted as vacant. In fact, so bad had William become, that on August 26th 1884 he had once been again admitted to the asylum, though this time on the request of his brother-in-law, Peter Anderson, husband of his sister Isabella. By now his physical condition had deteriorated. he was suffering from hemiplegia and cardiac exhaustion, with a note saying that his heartneat "sounds scarcely audible". His leg was heavily ulcerated, and his right arm and the left side of his face were bruised.His teeth were mostly gone,he had lost his appetite, and his right arm and right leg were described as having some paralysis, making his "motion and sensation impaired". However, the most telling part of his initial examination was the following comment:
Examination incomplete owing to the maniacal state. In a very filthy state & infected with pediculi corpous.
 
 
There is further comment on how he came to be admitted for a second time:
He was heard of at Crieff smashing windows rather wise misconducting himself. he has had a hemiplegic seizure since his discharge.
 
As well as being described as "sleepless" and "noisy and destructive", the two doctors examining William had the following to say:
Dr. Fleming - Talks incessantly, but on no subject in particular. All he says is downright nonsense
 
Dr. Christie - He is excited, talks in an incoherent rambling manner & seems quite unconscious of anything said to him.
 

By 1885-86, William is noted as having vacated his property at Belford Place (VR113/29/84). He in fact remained in the asylum from 1884 for the next six years, until his eventual death on January 22nd 1890, at 11.25am, aged 77. The cause of death was atheroma of cerebral arteries which he had had for many years, as well as apoplexy and congestion of the lungs for two days, as certified by Dr A.B.Urquhart. The informant to the Perth registrar two days later was his attendant, William Henry (GROS: 1890/387/0/51).
 
After his death the following note was placed in the Dundee Courier (14 APR 1890):
NOTICE
 
ALL Parties having CLAIMS against the Late WM. HENDERSON, some time residing at Belford Place, New Scone, and thereafter in Murray's Royal Asylum for Lunatics, Perth, are requested to Lodge the same with the SUBSCRIBER, within Ten Days from this Date; and those INDEBTED to the Deceased are requested to make Payment within the same Period.
 
John B. McCASH, Solictor, 28 High Street, Perth, Agent for the Executor.
 
Perth, 9th April, 1890.
 
William died intestate, and confirmation of his estate was made to his nephew Andrew Anderson, son of his sister Margaret.  The summary in the 1890 Confirmations and Inventories book reads:
HENDERSON, William - value of estate 3,337 14s 7d. Confirmation of William Henderson, an inmate at Murray's Royal Lunatic Asylum, Perth, who died 22 January 1890 at Murray's Royal Asylum, intestate, granted at Perth, to Andrew Anderson, Farmer, Park of Keillour, Methven, Executor dative qua next of kin.
 
The full inventory reads as follows:

Inventory of the Personal Estate of William Henderson

 

At Perth the Ninth day of April Eighteen hundred and Ninety In presence of Charles John Pearson, Knight Advocate Sheriff of Perthshire Compeared John Burns McCash Solicitor in Perth as Procurator for the Executor after named and designed and gave in the Inventory of the Personal Estate of William Henderson sometime an inmate of Murrays Royal Asylum for Lunatics Perth (duly stamped with one hundred and two pounds Sterling of duty) and oath thereon after written desiring the same to be recorded in the Register of Inventories of Personal Estates &c kept at Perth for the County of Perth conform to act of Parliament which desire the said Sheriff found reasonable and ordained the same to be done accordingly the tenor whereof follows:- Inventory of the Personal Estate wheresoever situated of William Henderson sometime an inmate of Murrays Royal Asylum for Lunatics Perth who died there on the Twenty second day of January Eighteen hundred and ninety

 

Scotland

1. Sum in charge of John Burns McCash Solicitor Perth as Curator bonis appointed on Seventeenth February Eighteen hundred and eighty five by the Lords of Council and Session to the said William Henderson as per his accounts of Intromissions lodged with the accountant of Court_______

(1) Sum in Mortgage or assignment by the Trustees of the Harbour of Dundee dated fifth April Eighteen hundred and seventy five in favour of the deceased therein named and designed William Henderson residing at New Scone by Perth__1000

(2) Sum in Bond and Disposition in Security by Mrs Jane Brown or Hall residing at number one hundred and one High Street Perth in favour of the deceased dated Twelfth and recorded in the Division of the General Register of Sasines applicable to the County of Perth Nineteenth November Eighteen hundred and eighty eight__600

(3) Sum in Bond and Disposition by Malcolm McGregor Manure Merchant Caledonian Road Perth in favour of the deceased dated Fifteenth and recorded in the Perth Burgh Register of Sasines Twenty second May Eighteen hundred and eighty nine__500

(4) Sum in Bond and Disposition in Security by Alexander Lockhart Rupe, Joiner Kinnoull Causeway Perth in favour of the deceased dated Third and recorded in the said Burgh Register of Sasines Eighteenth January Eighteen hundred and ninety__1200

 

2. Interest to date of Oath to Inventory

(1) 1000 due by Dundee Harbour Trs at 3 % from Martinmas 1889__12, 18s and 10d

(2) 600 due by Mrs Hall at 4% from Martinmas 1889__8, 5s and 8d

(3) 500 due by Malcolm McGregor at 4% from Martinmas 1889__6, 18s and 1d

(4) 1200 due by A. L. Rupe at 4% from 3rd January 1890__9, 12s

Total amount of Personal Estate__3337, 14s and 7d

Schedule of Funeral Expenses

R&J Marshal Funeral Undertakers Perth __10, 10s and 6d

(signed) Andrew Anderson JP,  Whitlet JP

 

Abstract

Total amount of Personal Estate as per foregoing Inventory__3337, 14s and 7d

Amount of Funeral expenses as per schedule__10, 10s and 6d

Nett Value of Personal Estate chargeable with Duty__3327, 4s and 1d

At Perth the Nineteenth day of March Eighteen hundred and ninety years In presence of James Peter Whitlet Esquire one of Her Majestys Justices of the Peace for the County of Perth appeared Andrew Anderson Farmer Park of Keillour Methven Executor of the deceased William Henderson sometime an inmate of Murrays Royal Asylum for Lunatics Perth, who being solemnly sworn and examined depones that the said William Henderson died at Perth domiciled there upon the Twenty second day of January Eighteen hundred and ninety unmarried: That the deponent is about to enter upon the possession and management of the deceased’s personal or moveable estate as executor dative qua one of the next of kin: That the deponent knows of no testamentary settlement or other writing left by the deceased relative to the disposal of his personal estate or effects or any part thereof: That the foregoing Inventory signed by the deponent and the said Justice of the Peace as relative hereto is a full and complete inventory of the personal estate and effects of the said deceased William Henderson wheresoever situated and belonging or due to him beneficially at the time of his death in so far as the same has come to the deponents knowledge: That the funeral expenses of the said deceased as shown in the foregoing schedule amount to Ten pounds ten shillings and sixpence: That the nett Value at this date of the said personal estate and effects situated in Scotland including the Proceeds accrued thereon sown to this date and after deducting the amount of the said Funeral expenses is Three thousand three hundred pounds Sterling and does not exceed Three thousand four hundred pounds Sterling: That confirmation of the said personal estate is required in favour of the deponent. All which is true as the deponent shall answer to God:

 

(signed) Andrew Anderson JP, Whitlet JP.

 
 
 
(3) Isobel Henderson
b: 6/6/1814   d: 24/3/1900
 
Isobel was born in Kinclaven in 1814:

Henderson - Isobel Daughter of Andw Henderson and Janet McEwen (Airntully) was born June 6th 1814

In the 1841 census, Isabella is not listed as living at home with her parents. She may in fact be the 24 year old female servant listed as living with farmer James Sims and his son James at Airntully. Although the age does not marry up, the 1841 census was notoriously innacurate, and so it remains a possibility.
 
Isobel married Peter Anderson, a farmer from Little Dunkeld in Perthshire. The banns for their wedding were proclaimed first in Little Dunkeld on 20/3/1842, and then in Kinclaven a week later on 27/3/1842. The couple settled down in Little Dunkeld and had a family of seven children, although it is known that one of the daughters did not survive beyond 1870.
 
A fairly traumatic period was endured by Isobel between 1866 and 1890. Her sister was murdered at her brother's farm in 1866, and in 1881, her brother William was temporarily placed into the Murray Royal Asylum. He was released after three months, but it appears that William subsequently spent some time with Isobel and Peter. By August 1884, his condition had deteriorated so much that Peter had William once again committed to the asylum, where he was to remain until his eventual death in 1890.
 
The Anderson family lived at Pendicles of Ardoch, Murthly, Little Dunkeld, and they obviously did well for themselves. According to the 1891 census, Peter, Isobel (listed as Isabella), Mary and Jean are all listed as "living on private means" at 17 Ardoch, a house with four rooms with one or more windows. Peter's age was listed as 72, whilst Isobel is 75, with Mary at 46 and Jean at 31 (GROS: 1891/373/8/000).

Isobel died on March 24th 1900 of senile decay, as certified by Dr K. Burgess. The registrar at Little Dunkeld was informed on the 27th by Jean.

By the 1901 census, Peter was still listed at the property, but was now recorded as a widower, and a retired land steward, with both Mary and Jean still living at home, and still "living on private means" (GROS: 1901/373).  
 
Peter eventually died in his home of Little Dunkeld in 1910, at the age of 91 (GROS: 1910/373/2).  
 
 
CHILDREN of ISOBEL HENDERSON and PETER ANDERSON:
Andrew Henderson Anderson
b: 16/6/1842
 
Andrew was born in Murthly, Little Dunkeld, on June 16th 1842.
 
On July 4th 1864, Andrew had the sad task of informing the Little Dunkeld registrar of the death of his younger sister Isabella, having been present the day before at her death at the young age of 16 (GROS:373/00/025).
 
At some stage prior to 1870, Andrew took up the calling to become a church minister, and coming from a dissenter family, naturally gravitated to the secessionist church, by now known as the United Presbyterian Church.
 
In October 1870, Andrew was appointed as one of the Trustees for his great uncle William Henderson's newly established Mortification Fund, for the benefit of the poor and elderly in Perth. With his great uncle's passing away, Andrew also became the recipient of William's gold watch and silver plate collection, as well as the hefty sum of six hundred pounds (in 2002, the equivalent would have been 35,100). In William's will, Andrew is described as "Licentiate of the United Presbyterian Church", which presumably indicates that he was posted in Perth at that stage.
 
At the age of 28, Andrew changed his posting to the large congregation of St. Andrew Place (Antiburgher) Church in Edinburgh. The History of the Congregations of the United Presbyterian Church 1733 - 1900, by Robert Small, tells us about Andrew's ordination there:
Third Minister - ANDREW H. ANDERSON, from Kinclaven. Ordained, on a yet more largely signed call, 17th January 1871, and Dr. Smart (NB: his predecessor) died on 21st June following in the seventieth year of his age and forty seventh of his minsitry. We recall with interest his words to Mr. Anderson in the prospect of having him for his colleague: "Unless I have greatly mistaken myself you will find me affectionate, considerate and strictly honourable in all my ways...
Andrew, however, soon found the strains of the posting difficult to handle, he left after only eighteen months in his post. The entry continues:
Mr. Anderson, finding himself unable to bear up under the pressure of minsterial work in so large a congregation, resigned his charge in less than two years, and his resignation was accepted 1st October 1872. With restored health and spirits he was inducted to Aldershot, 2nd September 1873.
On February 5th 1874, Andrew was breifly back in Scotland to marry 34 year old Margaret (Maggie) Campbell Smart, daughter of William Sheriff Smart, Minister of the United Presbyterian Church, Linlithgow (deceased), and Marion Haysmart. At the time of the wedding, Andrew was still based at Aldershot in Hampshire, whilst Maggie lived at 11 Smith Place ain Leith. The marriage took place at 11 Minder Street, the witnesses were John Wilson and Sam M. Smart, and it was registered in Edinburgh on the 7th (GROS:1874/685/02/36).
 
The History of the Congregations articles concludes with: 
In May 1875 he declined Singapore, but accepted Pollok Street, Glasgow, on 8th November following.
The Glasgow Herald of Tuesday November 9th 1875 recounts his his new posting to to the city (p.7):
GLASGOW - Pollok Street U. P. Church - At a meeting of the U. P. Presbytery of London last night, the Rev. A. H. Anderson, of Aldershot, accepted the call to Pollok Street Church, to be co-pastor with the Rev. Dr. Knox.
Andrew was to remain at Pollok Street for almost the next seventeen years, and bought a house in Prestwick, Ayrshire. However, all was to tragically end in 1892...
 
The first indication of the tragedy that befell Andrew came in page 6 of the Glasgow Herald of Friday, December 16th 1892: 
The Rev. A. H. Anderson, who recently demitted the charge of Pollok Street U. P. Church, Glasgow, left his house at Prestwick on Wednesday morning and has not been seen since. As his hat and coat were found in the forenoon on the bank of the Bell Rock Quarry considerable uneasiness prevails as to the fate of the reverend gentleman.
It was soon discovered that Andrew had tragically drowned in a pool in the quarry. The Evening Times of the 16th further takes up the story:
THE MISSING GLASGOW MINISTER
 
DISCOVERY OF THE BODY
 
Prestwick, Friday. - the body of the Rev. Mr. Anderson, late of Pollok Street U. P. Church, Glasgow, has just been found in the Bellrock Quarry, by Mr. Geddes, Glasgow, by diving operations.
Andrew's drowning at Bellrock Quarry, at 9.00am on December 14th 1892, was certified by Dr. Will Hewitt. The informant to the Prestwick registrar on the 17th was Alan King Smith, Andrew's brother-in-law. There was a further correction after the precognition, recorded in the RCE on January 2nd 1893, at Volume 1, page 102, which has still to be checked.
 
 
 
Mary Anderson
b: 22/1/1844   d: 9/11/1917 
 
In October 1870, Mary inherited a sum of fifty pounds from her great uncle, Dr. William Henderson (the equivalent value in 2002 was 2925).
Mary died a single woman at 5.30am on November 9th 1917, in her home, the family cottage at Ardoch in Murthly village, Perthshire. The cause was arterial sclerosis epistaces, as certified by DR R. Burgess. The informant to the Little Dunkeld registrar on the following day was Robert Gellatly, a neighbour from Dunvariot in Murthly (GROS: 1917/373/22).
 
 
 
Margaret Anderson 
b: 9/1/1846
 
In October 1870, Margaret inherited a sum of fifty pounds from her great uncle, Dr. William Henderson (the equivalent value in 2002 was 2925).
 
 
 
Isabel Anderson 
b: 2/1/1848  d: 3/7/1864
 
Isabel tragically died at her home of Ardoch at 4.46am on July 3rd 1864, at the age of 16. The cause was gastric fever, which she had suffered for five weeks, as certified by Dr. Andrew McLean of Stanley. Isabel's brother Andrew registered her death at Little Dunkeld on the following day, and on the death certificate her father was listed as being a quarryman. Isabel was single at the time of her death (GROS:1864/373/00/025).
 
 
 
Janet Anderson 
b: 16/5/1851
 
In October 1870, Janet inherited a sum of fifty pounds from her great uncle, Dr. William Henderson (the equivalent value in 2002 was 2925).
 
 
 
Agnes Anderson 
b: 1/1/1854
 
In October 1870, Agnes inherited a sum of fifty pounds from her great uncle, Dr. William Henderson (the equivalent value in 2002 was 2925).
 
 
 
Jean Anderson 
b: 16/6/1859
 
In October 1870, Jean inherited a sum of fifty pounds from her great uncle, Dr. William Henderson (the equivalent value in 2002 was 2925).
 
Jean remained at home in Pendicles of Ardoch, Murthly, until at least 1901, where she was recorded in the census as "living on private means" (see above). 
 
 
 

(4) Margaret Henderson
b: 15/12/1817
Henderson - Margaret Daughter to Andrew Henderson and Janet McEwen was born Dec 15th 1817
In the 1841 census, Margaret was not listed as living at home with her parents. She may in fact be the Margaret Henderson listed as a 20 year old female servant in Airdrum, working for 80 year old Janet Bruce. If this is correct, Janet Bruce will have in fact been her grandmother.
 
Margaret married labourer Thomas Anderson on March 2nd 1847 at the United Presbyterian Church of Kinclaven, and the couple initially settled in Ardoch, and then New Delvine, Little Dunkeld, where the couple raised a family. It is extremely likely that Margaret's husband was related to her sister Isobel's husband, also an Anderson, as they all initially lived in the same area, a pendicle at Ardoch.
 
Margaret died at Ardoch at 2.10am on December 16th 1869, at the age of 51. The cause of death was disease of the heart, bronchitis and conjection of lungs, as certified by Dr. Andrew McMillan of nearby Stanley. Her son, James Anderson, who was present as she died, informed the Little Dunkeld registrar later the same day (GROS:1869/373/00/059).
 
 
CHILDREN of MARGARET HENDERSON and THOMAS ANDERSON:
James Anderson
b: 18??
 
It is not yet known where James was born. He informed the Little Dunkeld registrar of his mother's death in 1859 (GROS:1869/373/00/059).
 
 
 
Thomas Anderson
b: 27/4/1851
 
Thomas was born at the Pendicles of Ardoch, on April 27th 1851 (IGI).
 
 
 
Andrew Anderson
b: 23/4/1853
 
Andrew was born at the Pendicles of New Delvine on April 23rd 1853 (IGI). He went on to become a farmer at the Park of Keillour, Methven, and was the next of kin who made the claim for the estate of his uncle William Henderson estate in 1890, upon his death (see above).
 
 
 
Peter Anderson
b: 17/12/1855
 
Peter was born at 3.00am on December 17th 1855, at Ardoch Pendicles, parish of Little Dunkeld. The record shows that his father Thomas was a labourer, aged 39, originally from Broompark in the parish of Little Dunkeld, whilst his mother was 37 and from Airdrum in the parish of Kinclaven, with Peter her fourth child. Peter's father was the informant to the registrar on the 23rd (GROS B 1855/373/00 0046 Little Dunkeld).
 

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Janet Henderson
22/11/1810 - 30/3/1866

Janet was Calum's, Jamie's and Pippa's four times great grandmother. She was brutally murdered in Perthshire in 1866.


Janet's corpse discovered [Your Family Tree(c) 2006 Future Publishing Ltd, illus.by Garry Walton]

Janet was born in the parish of Kinclaven in 1810, either at the village of Madderty, or Airntully, where she certainly grew up. She married James Rogers, a farm labourer, in Kinclaven in February 1836. The following are the Kinclaven OPR records for the proclamation of banns:

Rogers and Henderson

James Rogers belonging to the Parish of Little Dunkeld and Janet Henderson of this Parish were regularly proclaimed for Marriage on the Seventh and Fourteenth of February Eighteen Hundred and Thirty Six.

From the 1841 and 1861 censuses, the valuation rolls for Perthshire, and recently obtained information from Greg Ross, the following picture can be built up of Janet's life and tragic death:

After their wedding, James and Janet lived initially in the new village of Stanley, in the parish of Kinclaven in Perthshire. Stanley was a thriving village, where the population went through something of a boom at this time. The family possibly moved here to find work at the new cotton factory that had just opened. Whilst here, their daughters Ann, Janet and Margaret were born. James worked as both an agricultural labourer and a linen hand loom weaver, and by 1841 the family had moved to Garth.

By 1847, the family had moved to Kinclaven, where their fourth daughter Mary was born. In 1855 we learn that the family were living in Airntully, one of the few remaining villages in the parish. From the 1845 Statistical Account we learn something of the village.

"It is now greatly diminished in size and population, and in a few years, will, in all probability, also disappear. Its inhabitants are all linen weavers, who occupy a small portion of ground sufficient to maintain a cow, and produce meal and potatoes for their families, and who receive their webs from agents employed by the manuafacturers of Cupar Angus, Blairgowrie, Newburgh and other places."

From the valuation rolls, we learn that the family was paying 6 pounds, 15 shillings and 7 pence for their annual rent, to the landlord, Sir William Drummond Stewart, Bart. of Muthly. Of this amount, 10 shillings and 7 pence were interest. In 1859, Janet's daughter Janet married and left for Glasgow. And in 1860, the rent went up to 7 pounds per annum.

In the 1861 census we learn that Janet's husband, James, was by now an agricultural labourer, whilst her daughters Ann and Mary were now linen weavers. In 1864, the rent went up again to 8 and 15 shillings per annum.

On March 13th 1866, Janet was found brutally murdered at her brother William's farm at Mount Stewart. She had only recently arrived to look after her brother, whilst her husband went to work on an estate further north. William had no female servant at the time, and his ploughman lived in the nearby cottage at Linley. Janet's husband was working on the Rohallion estate further north and was to be away for a while, and all her children had left home by this time.

William had travelled to Perth early on March 30th on a business trip to the market. Upon his return he found the house locked up. On gaining entry, he found Janet, beaten to death in the kitchen. This was apparently a very bloody affair, which was steeped in mystery. The police discovered that the kitchen door was locked but the key was missing. It was eventually found after the outside cess pit was drained as a part of the investigation. Due to the fact that goods had been taken from the house, the event was finally put down to robbery. There were no immediate suspects, and William was cleared by the investigation which initially centred on a vagrant. Several people were apprehended and questioned but it was not until almost a year later that the farm's ploughman, Peter Crichton, was arrested and charged with the murder, but after a two day murder trial in April 1867, the verdict of non proven was made, and Crichton walked free.

Janet's body was released to her husband James Rogers by the police after the initial investigation and autopsy, and her death was registered by William on April 7th, 1866. No cause of death was listed in the register. Janet's funeral took place on April 5th 1866 at Auchtergaven Church, in the village of Bankfoot. A subsequent amendment to the death entry was made in the Register for Corrected Entries almost two years later , on May 12th 1868:
Register of Corrected Entries for the Parish of Forgandenny in the County of Perth.
 
The following report of a precognition has been received touching the death of Janet Henderson or Roger. registered under No. 4 in the Register book of death for the year 1866.
 
Name age and sex:
Janet henderson or Rodger aged about 51, a female, Perth 26th April 1867 certified by J. Young, Procurator Fiscal, 1st August 1867, Lindsay Bell, registrar.
 
When and where died:
Between 10 o'clock morning and 7 o'clock evening of Friday the 30th March 1866 within the Farm house of Mount Stewart in the Parish of Forgandenny and shire of Perth then occupied by William Henderson farmer.
 
Cause of death:
Injuries inflicted on the head by some one unknown as certified by Drs. Laing, Bridge of Earn, and Absolon, Perth, who dissected body.

On Saturday 16th March 2002, Calum and his parents visited Mount Stewart Farm to see the scene of the crime themselves. The farm building still stands, and is currently owned by Mrs Helen Lennox. When we introduced ourselves, and explained why we were there, Mrs Lennox told us that although she had been told about the incident when she first bought the farm forty years ago, she had never discovered any proof as to whether it was true or not. We confirmed it was true, and she then kindly showed us into the kitchen to see where the murder had been committed. It was a very cold room, although probably because there was no fire lit in the room, rather than any supernatural presence! After seeing the room, Mrs Lennox also explained that a neighbour had once told her that William Henderson's employee on the farm, James Crichton, was apparently slightly retarded, and that he had been prosecuted for the murder. She also told us of another rumour that had been created in the area, in which Janet's body had been discovered in the salt press beside the fire! So the rumour machine seems to have been working overtime in the area!


CHILDREN of JANET HENDERSON and JAMES ROGERS:

Janet Roger (Rodger)
b: 1836
 
Calum's, Jamie's and Pippa's three times great grandmother - see Rodger and Paton - part 1 pages.
 
 

Ann Roger
b: 1838 (in Stanley)
 
 
 
Margaret Roger
b: 1840 (in Perthshire)
 

 
Mary Roger
b: 1847 (in Kinclaven)

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Connecting

Janet Henderson married James Rogers in 1836

Daughter, Janet Rodger, married William Hay Paton in 1859

Son, David Hepburn Paton, married Jessie McFarlane in 1889

Son, Charles Paton, married Jane Currie in 1934

Son, Colin Paton, married Charlotte Harper Graham in 1969

Son, Christopher Mark Paton, married Claire Patricia Giles in 2000

Sons, Calum and Jamie (and cousin Pippa, to their uncle Colin)

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